West Wing Reads President Trump Was Right to Veto Resolution Blocking His National Emergency Declaration “President Trump’s veto Friday of a resolution blocking his declaration of a national emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border showed that he understands he wasn’t elected to appease career politicians in the Senate. He was elected, in part, to secure the southern border and protect American lives,” former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer writes. “When it comes to protecting the American people, Trump has made clear that there can be no compromise . . . This action is fully within his constitutional powers.” Click here to read more. “U.S. employers posted nearly 7.6 million open jobs in January, near a record high set in November,” Christopher Rugaber reports for The Associated Press. “The tally of available jobs now outnumbers the unemployed by roughly 1 million. Openings began to outpace the unemployed last spring, for the first time in the 18 years the data has been tracked.” “Criminal organizations in Mexico have mounted a lucrative new smuggling operation that uses express buses to deliver Guatemalan migrant families to the U.S. border in a matter of days, making the journey faster, easier and safer,” Nick Miroff writes in The Washington Post. Missing from The Washington Post’s story is that President Trump wants to close the loopholes powering this “conveyor belt,” while Congressional Democrats want to keep them. “U.S. consumer sentiment rose by more than expected as optimism picked up for incomes and the economy, suggesting support for growth in coming months,” Carlyann Edwards reports for Bloomberg. “The University of Michigan’s preliminary March sentiment index advanced to 97.8, the highest this year.” “The White House is urging Congress to set new limits on student loan borrowing by graduate students and parents, as part of a larger package spelling out the Trump administration’s priorities for higher education legislation,” Emily Wilkins reports for Bloomberg Government. “We need to modernize our higher education system to make it more affordable, flexible, and outcomes oriented so all Americans, young and old, can learn the skills they need to secure and retain good paying jobs,” Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump said in statement. Privacy Policy | Contact the White House | Unsubscribe The White House · 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW · Washington, DC 20500 · USA · 202-456-1111 1600 Daily The White House • March 18, 2019 See President Trump’s VETO message to Congressional Democrats Friday afternoon, President Donald J. Trump issued the first veto of his Presidency, striking down a Democrat-inspired measure to reject the declaration of a national emergency at our southern border. “As President, the protection of the nation is my highest duty,” President Trump said from the Oval Office before signing. “Yesterday, Congress passed a dangerous resolution that, if signed into law, would put countless Americans in danger—very grave danger.” Since 1976, U.S. presidents have declared a total of 59 national emergencies, most of them involving the protection of foreign citizens in far-off countries. Yet of all these actions, the only emergency Congress has ever pushed to revoke is one that actually protects our own homeland and our own citizens. In his official veto message to Congress, the President laid out how the current situation at our border is even more precarious than in years past: The situation at the southern border is rapidly deteriorating because of who is arriving and how they are arriving. For many years, the majority of individuals who arrived illegally were single adults from Mexico. Under our existing laws, we could detain and quickly remove most of these aliens. More recently, however, illegal migrants have organized into caravans that include large numbers of families and unaccompanied children from Central American countries. . . Under current laws, court decisions, and resource constraints, the Government cannot detain families or undocumented alien children from Central American countries in significant numbers or quickly deport them. Securing our border is vital to ensuring the safety and security of the American people. Tens of thousands of innocent American lives are being lost every year as drugs pour across our border—with more than 70,000 overdose deaths in 2017 alone. Criminal aliens and gang members also exploit our weak borders to gain entry into our country. “Congress’s vote to deny the crisis on the southern border is a vote against reality,” President Trump said Friday. Unfortunately, for many in Washington, that’s just business as usual. Read President Trump’s official VETO message to Congress. More: The President defended his authority to enforce immigration laws Ivanka Trump on how to fix American higher ed Today, Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump and the National Council for the American Worker released a set of proposals to reform the Higher Education Act before Congress. Together, these proposals outline the Trump Administration’s priorities for a higher education system that’s truly cost-effective for students and their families. “We need to modernize our higher education system to make it affordable, flexible, and outcome-oriented so all Americans, young and old, can learn the skills they need to secure and retain good-paying jobs,” Ms. Trump said today. Encouraging responsible borrowing is a key priority. Research shows that the availability of Federal student aid correlates with tuition increases. The current system saddles parents and graduate students with debt while giving too little attention to their likelihood or ability to repay. The result: The ever-rising cost of a college education—along with the accompanying growth in student loan balances—erodes the financial return of higher education for American students. By holding institutions accountable and better aligning their offerings to the needs of today’s workforce, we’ll better equip students of all backgrounds to take advantage of America’s red-hot job market. See the Administration’s proposal to reform the Higher Education Act. More: Bloomberg Government with a closer look at the plan Photo of the Day Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead President Trump signs the first veto of his presidency, striking down legislation to halt his Executive Order declaring a National Emergency along the southern border | March 15, 2019 Privacy Policy | Contact the White House | Unsubscribe The White House · 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW · Washington, DC 20500 · USA · 202-456-1111;

The White House • March 18, 2019See President Trump’s VETO message to Congressional Democrats 
Friday afternoon, President Donald J. Trump issued the first veto of his Presidency, striking down a Democrat-inspired measure to reject the declaration of a national emergency at our southern border.  

“As President, the protection of the nation is my highest duty,” President Trump said from the Oval Office before signing. “Yesterday, Congress passed a dangerous resolution that, if signed into law, would put countless Americans in danger—very grave danger.”

Since 1976, U.S. presidents have declared a total of 59 national emergencies, most of them involving the protection of foreign citizens in far-off countries. Yet of all these actions, the only emergency Congress has ever pushed to revoke is one that actually protects our own homeland and our own citizens.

In his official veto message to Congress, the President laid out how the current situation at our border is even more precarious than in years past:
     The situation at the southern border is rapidly deteriorating because of who is arriving and how they are arriving. For many years, the majority of individuals who arrived illegally were single adults from Mexico. Under our existing laws, we could detain and quickly remove most of these aliens. More recently, however, illegal migrants have organized into caravans that include large numbers of families and unaccompanied children from Central American countries. . . 

Under current laws, court decisions, and resource constraints, the Government cannot detain families or undocumented alien children from Central American countries in significant numbers or quickly deport them.  

  Securing our border is vital to ensuring the safety and security of the American people. Tens of thousands of innocent American lives are being lost every year as drugs pour across our border—with more than 70,000 overdose deaths in 2017 alone. Criminal aliens and gang members also exploit our weak borders to gain entry into our country.

“Congress’s vote to deny the crisis on the southern border is a vote against reality,” President Trump said Friday. Unfortunately, for many in Washington, that’s just business as usual.

Read President Trump’s official VETO message to Congress.

More: The President defended his authority to enforce immigration lawsIvanka Trump on how to fix American higher ed
Today, Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump and the National Council for the American Worker released a set of proposals to reform the Higher Education Act before Congress. Together, these proposals outline the Trump Administration’s priorities for a higher education system that’s truly cost-effective for students and their families.

We need to modernize our higher education system to make it affordable, flexible, and outcome-oriented so all Americans, young and old, can learn the skills they need to secure and retain good-paying jobs,” Ms. Trump said today.

Encouraging responsible borrowing is a key priority. Research shows that the availability of Federal student aid correlates with tuition increases. The current system saddles parents and graduate students with debt while giving too little attention to their likelihood or ability to repay.

The result: The ever-rising cost of a college education—along with the accompanying growth in student loan balances—erodes the financial return of higher education for American students. By holding institutions accountable and better aligning their offerings to the needs of today’s workforce, we’ll better equip students of all backgrounds to take advantage of America’s red-hot job market.

See the Administration’s proposal to reform the Higher Education Act.

More: Bloomberg Government with a closer look at the planPhoto of the DayOfficial White House Photo by Shealah CraigheadPresident Trump signs the first veto of his presidency, striking down legislation to halt his Executive Order declaring a National Emergency along the southern border | March 15, 2019

Privacy Policy | Contact the White House | UnsubscribeThe White House · 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW · Washington, DC 20500 · USA · 202-456-1111

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President Trump Was Right to Veto Resolution Blocking His National Emergency Declaration

“President Trump’s veto Friday of a resolution blocking his declaration of a national emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border showed that he understands he wasn’t elected to appease career politicians in the Senate. He was elected, in part, to secure the southern border and protect American lives,” former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer writes.
 
“When it comes to protecting the American people, Trump has made clear that there can be no compromise . . . This action is fully within his constitutional powers.”
 
Click here to read more.

“U.S. employers posted nearly 7.6 million open jobs in January, near a record high set in November,” Christopher Rugaber reports for The Associated Press. “The tally of available jobs now outnumbers the unemployed by roughly 1 million. Openings began to outpace the unemployed last spring, for the first time in the 18 years the data has been tracked.”

“Criminal organizations in Mexico have mounted a lucrative new smuggling operation that uses express buses to deliver Guatemalan migrant families to the U.S. border in a matter of days, making the journey faster, easier and safer,” Nick Miroff writes in The Washington Post. Missing from The Washington Post’s story is that President Trump wants to close the loopholes powering this “conveyor belt,” while Congressional Democrats want to keep them.

“U.S. consumer sentiment rose by more than expected as optimism picked up for incomes and the economy, suggesting support for growth in coming months,” Carlyann Edwards reports for Bloomberg. “The University of Michigan’s preliminary March sentiment index advanced to 97.8, the highest this year.”

“The White House is urging Congress to set new limits on student loan borrowing by graduate students and parents, as part of a larger package spelling out the Trump administration’s priorities for higher education legislation,” Emily Wilkins reports for Bloomberg Government. “We need to modernize our higher education system to make it more affordable, flexible, and outcomes oriented so all Americans, young and old, can learn the skills they need to secure and retain good paying jobs,” Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump said in statement.


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